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Tebow: The Good, The Bad And The Ugly

by: AnthonyP On  Monday, January 12, 2009

Tim TebowTotal Pro Sports – The TPS team would like to introduce one of our newest writers “Chad Ellis”. Chad will be following and writing about football (NCAA/NFL). His knowledge on the game is endless and articles informative. We would like to thank Chad for choosing Total Pro Sports.

Chad’s first article is in response to GTA 4, “I was just wondering what you think about Tim Tebow retuning next year?”

Tebow, oh Tebow…That is an itch I would be happy to scratch. Do I like his decision to stay in school? The answer is: ABSOLUTELY! To begin, let me just say that I agree with the consensus that Tebow is one of the greatest college players to ever suit up. He has all the tools (tangibles and intangibles) to run the Florida offense well, he is a beast running the football, and has a chance next year to become the greatest player in NCAA history. His ability, production, and dominance at the college level are obvious and undisputed.

As football fans, however, we usually only notice the obvious. His numbers and record as a starting quarterback would lead the average fan to wonder what more he has to prove at the college level. Why wouldn’t he go pro? After all, he has a Heisman, national titles, and some of the best numbers ever put up. He’d be an easy first round draft pick, right? WRONG!

Tebow is a classic example of why comparing the NFL to NCAA football is like comparing the NBA to the WNBA – and I say that without taking into account the HUGE difference in overall talent. The brand of football played in the NFL is so much different than the NCAA that, in many cases, evaluating players is extremely difficult, even for scouts and GM’s. To draw an illustration, if the NCAA is a butcher, the NFL is a brain surgeon. Evaluations are, or at least should be, behavior based–not performance based. The only attributes that Tebow has that scouts will like are his size and mobility. He doesn’t have the great arm, or great accuracy. He has terrible feet, and very poor eye discipline. He doesn’t read coverage well, and doesn’t anticipate his throws consistently.

The offense that Florida runs certainly has contributed to his developmental issues. It is a first read, run first, offense designed to get superior athletes the ball to take advantage of CONSTANT mismatches. He faces eight and 9 man boxes all day long, which is why he has been a productive passer. Florida rarely, if ever, trails in any game, so his passing ability never has to carry the team–thank God.

When he finally does enter an NFL training camp, he will have to learn how to play football all over again–from scratch! I mean down to taking a snap from center, to learning how to take a proper three, five, and seven step drop. He has such a long way to go that I doubt he’d be drafted in the first four rounds. His legacy ends at Florida so I’m thrilled, for him, that he will be cementing it next season.




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