Celebration Fail: Cane's Jussi Jokinen Scores Goal, Takes a Spill (Video)
Tubby Smith and the Gophers Celebrate Big Win Over Wisconsin by Dancing to Kesha (Video)

Mic Catches Somebody Calling Somebody Else a “F–king A–hole” at the Lakers-Clippers Game (Video)

by: Esteban On  Friday, February 15, 2013

f-bomb during lakers clippers game

I would never have imagined myself saying this, but athletes are going to have to start watching their language.

It’s not that I’m easily offended by a little f*@&ing curse word here and there. I really have no problem with guys competing hard and expressing themselves while doing so. But we all know that American TV viewers can be a little sensitive at times. I mean, after Janet Jackson’s “wardrobe malfunction” at Super Bowl XXXVIII, you would have thought somebody had kicked a puppy and spit on the American flag based on the reaction from the vocal public and FCC. Now the networks are all so terrified of getting fined that hardly any “live event” is really live anymore. Sporting events are one of the few exceptions, of course, but at the rate we’re going, that’s not going to be the case for much longer.

You see, there have been a number of notable f-bombs dropped on live TV in recent years. Nyjer Morgan dropped one during the 2011 MLB Playoffs. Dustin Brown let one fly after winning the Stanley Cup last year. And of course, most recently, Joe Flacco was caught uttering a colorful superlative after winning the Super Bowl two weekends ago.

Now there’s this one from last night’s game between the Lakers and Clippers in Los Angeles:

This was unintentional, of course. Whoever said it obviously had no way of knowing it would end up on TV. Moreover, I doubt any young impressionable children will turn to a life of crime simply because they heard the f-word on TNT last night.

But all it takes is one crazy person to make a fuss, and pretty soon we could have a tape delay on live sporting events. So, in light of this, I ask pro athletes everywhere: please, watch your language.

Or, perhaps the networks could just stop using CIA spy technology to capture game audio. Whatever works.




CHECK OUT THESE STORIES FROM THE WEB

LATEST STORIES