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Anthony Rizzo Jumps on Tarp and Dives Into Stands to Make Amazing Catch on Foul Ball (Video)

by: Esteban On  Thursday, August 13, 2015

anthony rizzo jumps on tarp to catch foul ball

Cubs first baseman Anthony Rizzo must have seen what Russell Martin did while trying to catch a foul ball in Toronto the other night, because on Wednesday he tried something similar at Wrigley. Only this time it actually worked.

On Wednesday night, the Cubs were up 2-1 on the Brewers in the top of the sixth when Ryan Braun hit a pop foul down the first base line that normally would have fallen harmlessly into the stands because the rolled up tarp prevents players from getting right up next to the wall. However, Rizzo had other ideas. Inspired by Martin, who jumped up onto the dugout railing in pursuit of a foul ball on Tuesday, Anthony Rizzo jumps up on the tarp, steps onto the top of the wall, leans over the stands, and makes a phenomenal catch before falling into the second row.

At first it seemed like all Rizzo would get for his efforts was a few pats on the back from some adoring Cubs fans. However, after conferring with each other on the field, the umpires ruled it a fair catch and awarded the Cubs the out.

Take a look:

In case you were wondering, here is the official MLB rule concerning catching balls that are out-of-play:

Rule 5.09(a)(1) Comment (Rule 6.05(a ) Comment): A fielder may reach into, but not step into, a dugout to make a catch, and if he holds the ball, the catch shall be allowed. A fielder, in order to make a catch on a foul ball nearing a dugout or other out-of-play area (such as the stands), must have one or both feet on or over the playing surface (including the lip of the dugout) and neither foot on the ground inside the dugout or in any other out-of-play area. Ball is in play, unless the fielder, after making a legal catch, falls into a dugout or other out-of-play area, in which case the ball is dead. Status of runners shall be as described in Rule 5.06(c (3) Comment (Rule 7.04(c) Comment).

As you can see, the rule does not specify what is considered the “out-of-play” area. Chances are that is delineated in each MLB ballpark’s official ground rules.

In this case, the umpires got together and apparently decided that the top of the wall, like “the lip of the dugout,” is in-play. And the result was one of the most entertaining foul ball outs we’ve seen in a long time.