Jake Arrieta No-Hitter Is 2nd Against Dodgers in Last 10 Days
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Jake Arrieta No-Hitter Is Second Against Dodgers in Last 10 Days (Video)

by: Esteban On  Monday, August 31, 2015

jake arrieta no-hitter 2

Cubs pitcher Jake Arrieta threw a no-hitter on Sunday night at Dodgers Stadium.

It was the second time the Dodgers had been held hitless in the last 10 days. And while some fans will probably argue that the achievement will always have an asterisk next to it, any way you slice it Arrieta was absolutely brilliant. The guy struck out 12 and walked just one, and needed just 116 pitches to put away the Dodgers.

Oh, and he finished the game in style, too, striking out the side in the ninth.

So why will some fans want to see an asterisk in the record books next to the Jake Arrieta no-hitter? Because of a slightly questionable ruling by official scorekeeper Jerry White. In the third inning, Enrique Hernandez hit a grounder that Cubs second baseman Starlin Castro couldn’t field cleanly, and White scored it E4.

Dodgers first baseman Adrian Gonzalez said he asked five different Cubs baserunners if they thought it was a hit, and they all said yes. And after the game, during his post-game interview, Arrieta himself admitted that he thought it would be ruled a hit. But no.

However, you certainly can’t accuse Jerry White of being biased. Scorekeepers usually show bias towards the home team, seeing as how they all work for the home team.

You can’t accuse White of being influenced by the moment, either. It was only the third inning. White had no way of knowing Arietta would retire 20 of the next 21 batters without giving up a hit.

The fact is, given the way the game played out, White’s ruling would probably have been questioned either way. At least he looked at the replay several times before deciding to call it an error.

“If he stays down on the ball, he makes the play,” he explained after the game. “He came up thinking the ball was coming up. The ball was hit right at him, and he didn’t have to move to make the play.”

Hit or no hit, though, that was still one hell of a game by Arrieta.

There’s a stat called “game score” devised by Bill James that assigns a numerical value to pitching performances based on the number of outs recorded, the number of strikeouts, and the number of hits, walks, and runs allowed. Heading into Sunday night, there had only ever been 26 pitching performances with a game score of 98 or higher in a nine-inning game.

When Arieta was done mowing down the Dodgers, there were 27.

Want to see his dominance with your own eyes? Here’s every out the guy recorded:

Hat Tip – [ESPN]