MLB to Destroy Cleveland Indians World Series Gear
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MLB to Destroy Cleveland Indians World Series Gear Rather than Donate It (Pics)

by: Esteban On  Thursday, November 10, 2016
Image via Getty

Image via Getty

Professional sports leagues always produce championship gear for both teams playing in the finals. That way, no matter who wins, they’ll be ready to sell merchandise immediately, while people are still on cloud nine and not asking whether they really need to spend $175 on a t-shirt, hat, and hoodie. The gear for the losing team is then donated to charities that distribute the clothing to people in need around the world.

Surely you’ve seen the memes.

In one respect, the 2016 World Series was no different. The folks at Major League Baseball had World Series Champions gear ready to go for both the Chicago Cubs and Cleveland Indians. However, in an interesting twist, it turns out that all that worthless Cleveland Indians World Series gear will not be donated to charity. Instead, MLB says all that stuff will be destroyed.

“In past years we have used [the Christian charity] World Vision, but we have moved our policy to destroying the merchandise,” MLB’s Matt Bourne told The Huffington Post. “The reason is to protect the team from inaccurate merchandise being available or visible in the general marketplace.”

Of course, there are some folks out there who think it’s probably no coincidence that MLB has decided to change it’s policy only now that they have a bunch of Cleveland Indians World Series gear on their hands. Given the controversy surrounding the team’s name and its (sorry, anti-PC police, but I gotta say it) incredibly offensive Chief Wahoo mascot, MLB probably did not want to be accused of shipping American racism to underprivileged Afghani kids.

And yes, Chief Wahoo was all over the Cleveland Indians World Series gear. Take a look:

Image via SportsLogos.net

Image via SportsLogos.net

Image via SportsLogos.net

Image via SportsLogos.net

Image via SportsLogos.net

Image via SportsLogos.net

Image via SportsLogos.net

Image via SportsLogos.net

Image via SportsLogos.net

Image via SportsLogos.net

Yep, getting rid of this stuff was probably a good idea from a PR point of view.

Hat Tip – [HuffPost, SportsLogos.net]



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